Muse + auxiliary electrode


#1

Hi everyone,

I am very interested in neurofeedback and would like to get a system for private use soon. I studied psychology and neuroscience and therefore have some experience with EEG and BCI.

I am now looking for an easy to use EEG system that I can use at home without a lot of effort. I’ve read a couple of threads here, but I still haven’t found the ideal solution for me. I’d like to use it mainly for meditation, attention, but also ILF, and maybe other things in future.

At the moment my favorite would be a Muse with an auxiliary electrode (like Myndlift). Has anyone experience with the Myndlift system or is already using the Muse with an extra electrode?

Would this set-up be well-suited for my purpose (meditation, attention, ILF)?

Which software would you recommend? I would like to try different things and I am interested in analyzing the data. So I’m not really looking for black-box like applications.

Is it easily possible to add the extra electrode to the Muse? Or would it be the best solution to directly get a Myndlift system?

BTW: I am using a Mac, so this might possibly limit the software available.

In case you have any other recommendations I’d be happy, too.

Thanks a lot in advance!


#2

no.

Sounds l like you need to go towards something more advanced, like Open BCI @ http://openbci.com/


#3

Actually, yes you can.
To make your own single wire electrode use Pin 2 on the USB port for the 2016 Muse.
You will need to use shielded wire and ground the shielding it to the usb plug ground.

You can turn on the display/recording of the Aux_R sensor in Muse Monitor settings.


#4

Thanks for the info.

Do you think this setup is suited for my purpose (training of meditation, attention, ILF)? And what software could you recommend as I am using a Mac / iPhone?

I have also looked into openBCI, but it seems a little bit cumbersome compared to the Muse.


#5

The Muse doesn’t come with any algorithms, only raw data. If you’re ok with calculating meditation, attention etc yourself from raw data then it’s a great system. If algorithms aren’t your thing, then it might be better to go with a system that has them build in to the SDK.

Software wise, obviously I’m going to recommend my own: Muse Monitor :wink:
With Muse Monitor you can record directly on your mobile device and save to your own personal storage (dropbox etc). This has the benefit of not having the headache of finding one of the very few Bluetooth USB devices which will actually connect to the Muse on a Mac/PC.


#6

Here is a guide for making auxillary channel electrode.

This electrode is compatible with Muse Direct.

-T


#7

And what do you think a muse that’s been opened up and wires soldered to it is going to be like exactly?


#8

Who was talking about opening it and soldering wires to it?
It would still be the easy solution for meditation as it is, plus an extra electrode attachable via USB for other purposes.


#9

Can this be done with Muse Monitor? Or which software would I have to use?


#10

Muse Monitor will give you all the brainwave values that you need to calculate, but to work out a result you need an algorithm.

Interaxon have not released the algorithm which they use in their Calm app.

A lot of people have said that “relaxation” is higher than usual Alpha, but working this out is rather subjective and I believe you would need to average the results out over multiple sessions, after also taking multiple session to determine your “usual” figure. This makes it quite difficult to work out over short recording periods.